Student spotlight: Social Enterprise Jewellery

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Meet Florence, Founder of Sweet Cavanagh.

What is Sweet Cavanagh?

We are a peer-led aftercare service for women recovering from eating disorders and addictions. We employ the women and teach them how to make and design jewellery. There is next to no after care in London, especially for free. I strongly believe that much of relapse could be avoided if there was adequate after care in place to support people as they entered that very vulnerable stage of recovery.

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How SEWF framed my views on our sector

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Post by Prateeksha Singh, Business & Operations Manager SSE Ontario 

There is a sense of clarity that arises from quite introspection, at least for me. No different is the case as I think of my experience in Calgary, Alberta attending the Social Enterprise World Forum in October.  I think instantly of the light hearted but sincere opening by Peter Holbrook, CEO of Social Enterprise UK and the poignant closing remarks shared by Pamela Hartigan, Director of the Skoll Centre of Social Entrepreneurship at Oxford University’s Said Business School. These moments are important, at least for me, because they capture of the range of emotions and thoughts evoked by the conference. A quick glance around the room during sessions and I knew I wasn’t the only one- the feelings were pretty unanimous. As expected, the other speakers were also the crème de la crème, but I would be lying if I did not add that I was even more impressed by those attending and here are two reasons what I think that tells us about the state of this sector:

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Reflections on SEWF2013: A Lasting Impression of Looking Forward

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by Miles DePaul

What’s holding social enterprise back from becoming the powerful force for good we want, and expect, it to be? It might be a lack of measurement, barriers to mainstream capital, opposing priorities across the sector, a general lack of awareness of social enterprise, inability to attract true transformative leaders to sector, the disappointment of consistent failure in the face of intractable problems, or the go-to answer: policy and political barriers. Yes, all true, but coming out of the Social Enterprise World Forum (SEWF) last week in Calgary Alberta, I realized these questions were raised but not lamented, and instead conversations were about what’s catalyzing a clear new path forward for social enterprise in Canada.

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